How to Make Thick and Creamy Yogurt with Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker

In a rush? Jump straight to the yogurt recipe! Or learn how to make Greek yogurt.

I struggle to eat healthily and get enough exercise on a regular basis. In my attempts to sneak more fruits into my diet, I’ve started to drink a lot more smoothies.

Most of my favorite smoothie recipes, however, require yogurt as a base. As much as I love yogurt, my family doesn’t like yogurt as much as I do. As a result, I end up eating most of the yogurt in our fridge on my own. I found that I can’t eat an entire tub of yogurt by myself, and tinier cartons of yogurt are often more expensive than bulk containers.

I realized that if I’m going to get my smoothie fix without wasting a lot of money, then I need to make my own yogurt. If figured that if I make my own yogurt, I could control the portion sizes, the flavor, and the amount of sugar that I consume.

Eurocuisine yogurt in a jar with a spoon

I purchased a Euro Cuisine yogurt maker thinking that it would be a breeze to make the perfect batch of yogurt whenever I wanted. Just heat some milk, mix in some culture, and let the maker do the rest, right?

Not quite.

The instructions for the yogurt maker were bare bones at best. Though I followed the instructions to the letter, I often got sour, runny yogurt that made me question my love of dairy.

But if you know me, I’m a bit stubborn. When a recipe proves difficult, I don’t drop it and move to something better. I research, I tweak, and I experiment until I get it right. It’s taken me quite a few tries to perfect this yogurt, and now I can make thick, creamy yogurt every single time. I love it so much that I doubt I’ll ever go back to store-bought yogurt (unless I need a fresh culture).

Now you can reap the benefits of my hard work and make beautiful, tasty yogurt for yourself.

Things You’ll Need for Regular Yogurt

So you’ve got yourself a yogurt maker? That’s great! But it’s only the first step to making great yogurt. I’ve found that I need a whole array of tools to make thick and creamy yogurt:

  • One 9″ x 13″ Rectangular Glass Casserole Dish. This is optional – I find it easier to hold steady temperatures in the oven rather than on the stovetop.
  • A Double Boiler or a Heavy-Bottomed Sauce Pot. A double boiler keeps the milk from burning on the bottom, but any sauce pot will do in a pinch.
  • A Probe Thermometer. This is essential. You need to keep a close eye on temperatures.
  • A Fine Mesh Strainer or Colander with a Cheesecloth. This is to strain the skin after putting the milk in the oven.
  • A Small Mixing Bowl or Container. It needs to be big enough to whisk about 8 ounces of milk.
  • A Medium Mixing Bowl or Container. It doesn’t need to be fancy, but it does need to hold 42 ounces of milk.
  • A Large Mixing Bowl or Container. It needs to be large enough to hold the medium mixing bowl along with ice water.
  • A Wire or Silicone Whisk. You need to stir the milk constantly on the stove or your milk will burn.
  • A Funnel. If you have a steady hand, you don’t need a funnel. But funnels definitely make the job easier.

And of course, don’t forget the Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker along with 7 glass yogurt jars. Or, if you have something similar, go for it.

My Favorite Yogurt Recipe

Eurocuisine yogurt in a jar with a spoon

Thick ‘n’ Creamy Yogurt with Euro Cuisine

Have a Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker? Here's how to make thick 'n' creamy yogurt every single time. No straining necessary.
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Incubation Time 10 hrs
Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 7

Ingredients
  

  • 1190.68 Grams Whole Milk* (5 1/4 Cups or 42 Ounces)
  • 17.5 Grams Fage Greek Yogurt, Unflavored* (1 Tablespoon)

Optional Flavorings

  • 85 Grams Torani Syrup* (6 Tablespoons)

Instructions
 

How to Make Unflavored Yogurt

  • Pre-heat the 9"x13" glass casserole dish inside the oven at 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius).
  • In a double boiler, bring 42 ounces whole milk to 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius), whisking regularly. *
  • Transfer the milk to the oven and let sit at 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius) for 30 minutes.
  • Remove milk from oven and use a fine mesh strainer and bowl to strain the skin.
  • Rapid cool the milk to 100° Fahrenheit (37° Celsius). I prefer to submerge the medium mixing bowl into a larger mixing bowl holding ice water. Whisk consistently while the temperature cools.
  • Remove the container from the ice bath to keep it from dropping lower than 95° Fahrenheit (35° Celsius).
  • Pour a about 1 cup of the milk into a small mixing bowl. Whisk 1 tablespoon of the Unflavored Fage Greek Yogurt into the milk until the yogurt dissolves completely. Pour the mixture back into the rest of the milk and whisk thoroughly.
  • Use a funnel to divide the milk evenly among the 7 glass yogurt jars.
  • Place the yogurt jars in the Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker – do not include their individual lids.
  • Add the lid to the Euro Cuisine maker and turn on the switch – the maker will light up.
  • Let the yogurt incubate undisturbed for 10 hours. Ensure the maker is in a place where it won't be jostled and the temperature remains fairly even.
  • Remove the Euro Cuisine lid and put the smaller lids on the individual jars.
  • Place the yogurt in the fridge and chill for at least 4 hours before serving, preferably longer.
  • Enjoy!

How to Make Flavored Yogurt

  • Follow all the instructions for the unflavored yogurt until steps 7.
  • Pour 6 ounces of milk mixture into one of the jars (I prefer the jar in the middle because that's easier to remember). This jar will remain unflavored for your next yogurt batch.
  • In the remaining milk mixture, whisk in the Torani syrup, then divide the mixture among the jars.
  • Follow the rest of the instructions for the unflavored yogurt.

Notes

Regular Yogurt-
*I’ve played around with lower fat milk, and the results varied. My goal for this recipe was extra thick, creamy yogurt that didn’t need straining and that requires a higher fat content.
*Also, I’ve found that milk quality varies depending on the store you by from. I often buy milk from Wal-Mart, and when I bought milk from Smith’s I was surprised to find that my resulting milk was creamier and smoother – I’m not sure why. 
*You don’t have to use Fage Greek Yogurt as your base. I’ve tried a few different yogurt starters with varying results. Fage gave me consistently, thick, creamy, and delicious yogurt every time and I could make multiple batches from those batches. Yogourmet yogurt starter, however, resulted in runny, sour yogurt and I could only make about 4 batches before I had to use a new starter.
*My stovetop is inconsistent at best. I find it’s easier to maintain steady temperatures inside my oven than on my stove. If you can consistently maintain a temperature on your stovetop for 30 minutes, then you can save yourself some mess and just keep the milk in your double boiler on the stove. 
Flavored Yogurt-
*You don’t have to use Torani syrup when flavoring your yogurt. I like it because it doesn’t alter the consistency of the yogurt and the flavor comes through nicely. I use about 1 tablespoon of syrup per yogurt jar, though you could use more or less depending on your preference. 
*Part of the appeal of a Euro Cuisine yogurt maker is that you can make multiple flavors of yogurt in one batch. Feel free to mix and match depending on what syrups you have available. I personally like the French Vanilla, French Toast, and Strawberry flavors. 
Keyword Euro Cuisine Yogurt, Thick Yogurt, Yogurt

What About Greek Yogurt?

Greek Yogurt is especially thick yogurt. It tends to be more expensive than regular yogurt, and it’s definitely more indulgent and decadent than its regular counterpart. I personally love using Fage Greek Style yogurt as a culture for my own homemade yogurt.

I intentionally made my thick ‘n’ creamy yogurt thick enough to hold up a spoon, so I wouldn’t have to strain each individual jar to achieve the desired consistency. But some days, I crave Greek style yogurt, and fortunately, the Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker has me covered.

jars of yogurt made with Eurocuisine yogurt maker

To make Greek style yogurt, you need to have a reliable way to strain the excess whey. Although you could take the time to strain each individual jar to make single-serve Greek yogurt containers, that method takes more energy and effort than I have most days.

So, I’ve come up with an alternative method for making Greek yogurt in the Euro Cuisine Yogurt maker. Rather than 7 individual jars, I use one solid glass container that I already had on hand. If you have a heat-friendly glass container that fits in your Euro Cuisine maker, then you can make Greek yogurt, too.

Things You’ll Need for Greek Yogurt

Greek Yogurt requires many of the same items as regular yogurt, with a few exceptions:

  • One 9″ x 13″ Rectangular Glass Casserole Dish. This is optional – I find it easier to hold steady temperatures in the oven rather than on the stovetop.
  • A Double Boiler or a Heavy-Bottomed Sauce Pot. I find a double boiler keeps the milk from burning on the bottom.
  • A Probe Thermometer. This is essential. You need to keep a close eye on temperatures.
  • A Fine Mesh Strainer. For straining the skin off the milk.
  • A Small Mixing Bowl or Container. It needs to be big enough to whisk about 8 ounces of milk.
  • A Medium Mixing Bowl or Container. It doesn’t need to be fancy, but it does need to hold 42 ounces of milk.
  • A Large Mixing Bowl or Container. It needs to be large enough to hold the medium mixing bowl along with ice water.
  • A Wire or Silicone Whisk.
  • A Eurocuisine Yogurt Maker. This is the brand I use – if you have something similar, go for it.
  • A 32-Ounce Glass Container. This is the biggest size of single container that I managed to fit inside my yogurt maker.
  • A Colander with a Cheesecloth. For straining the whey after incubation.
  • A Medium Mixing Bowl or Container. This second bowl is optional. You only need this if you wish to use the strained whey to make more Greek Yogurt.

If you’re resourceful, you don’t have to use all of these items exactly. For example, if you can keep a consistent temperature on your stove, you don’t need the casserole dish to put the milk in the oven. Similarly, if you don’t have a heavy bottomed sauce pot, a regular pot will do just fine if you can whisk the milk enough to keep it from burning on the bottom.

yogurt in a jar made with Eurocuisine yogurt maker

Thick ‘N’ Creamy Greek Yogurt with Euro Cuisine

With a few extra steps, you can turn your regular yogurt into Greek style yogurt with the Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker.
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Incubation Time 10 hrs
Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 7

Ingredients
  

  • 907 Grams Whole Milk (4 Cups or 32 Ounces)
  • 12 Grams Fage Greek Yogurt, Unflavored (2 Teaspoons)

Instructions
 

  • Pre-heat the 8"x8" glass casserole dish inside the oven at 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius).
  • In a double boiler, bring 32 ounces whole milk to 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius), whisking regularly. *
  • Transfer the milk to the oven and let sit at 180° Fahrenheit (82° Celsius) for 30 minutes.
  • Remove milk from oven and use a fine mesh strainer to strain the skin into a bowl.
  • Rapid cool the milk to 100° Fahrenheit (37° Celsius). I like to submerge the medium container into a larger container containing ice water. Whisk consistently while the temperature cools.
  • Remove the container from the ice bath to keep it from dropping lower than 95° Fahrenheit (35° Celsius).
  • Pour a small portion of the milk into a small mixing bowl. Whisk 2 teaspoons of the Unflavored Fage Greek Yogurt into the small amount of milk until the yogurt dissolves completely. Pour the mixture back into the rest of the milk and whisk thoroughly.
  • Pour the milk into a 32-ounce glass container (I found this was the biggest size of container that I could comfortably fit inside my EuroCuisine maker on its own).
  • Place the glass container in the Eurocuisine – do not include its individual lid.
  • Add the lid to the Eurocuisine maker and turn on the switch – the maker will light up.
  • Let the yogurt incubate undisturbed for 10 hours. Make sure the maker is in a place where it won't be jostled and the temperature remains fairly even.
  • Remove the EuroCuisine maker lid and put lid on the glass container.
  • Place the yogurt in the fridge and chill for at least 8 hours, preferably over night.
  • Remove the yogurt from the fridge and set aside some unflavored regular yogurt for making your next batch. You only need a tablespoon, but I tend to set aside a 6 ounce EuroCuisine jar since it's easy.
  • Drape a cheesecloth over a colander and place it over a bowl or container.
  • Place the yogurt in the cheesecloth and let strain in the fridge until yogurt reaches the desired consistency.*
  • Scoop the Greek yogurt into a container with a lid and keep in the fridge until serving. Discard the whey or use it to make more yogurt.*

Notes

*I find straining the yogurt about 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours in the fridge is perfectly thick. If you want it thicker, you can strain it for longer. If you want it a little thinner or if you accidently strained too much, don’t worry. You can whisk a tablespoon of the whey at a time back into the yogurt until you achieve your desired consistency. 
*You can use whey cultures as a starter instead of Fage yogurt to make more yogurt. I have not perfected this method, however, but my current estimate is about 1/3 cup whey per 32 ounces of milk rather than 1 tablespoon. 
Keyword Euro Cuisine Yogurt, Greek Yogurt

Troubleshooting

I ran into a lot of issues and had a lot of questions when I first started my yogurt making adventure. Here were some of the most common problems, and here are some of the answers I found along the way.

My Yogurt Is Too Sour. Yogurt is naturally sour thanks to the fermentation process. However, this recipe should result in just faintly sour yogurt – not super sour yogurt. If your yogurt is too sour, you may have used too much culture (resulting in faster fermentation), may have let your yogurt incubate too long or at too high of a temperature, may have used a poor culture that didn’t ferment properly, or you may have used milk that was too old.

My Yogurt Is Still Runny. I did everything I could to ensure my yogurt recipe result in thick, creamy yogurt. However, you should keep in mind that homemade yogurt tends to be a little more runny than store-bought yogurt because yogurt manufacturers often add thickeners to achieve the consistency they want. If your yogurt is really runny and didn’t thicken at all, you may have used too little culture, may have cut your incubation time short, or may have incubated your yogurt at too cold of a temperature. Another possibility is that your yogurt culture has died, and you’ll need a fresh culture to create more batches.

My Yogurt Is Lumpy. Your yogurt should have a silky smooth texture. If it has turned lumpy, you may have inconsistent temperatures to blame. Making yogurt at too high of a temperature for too long will cause the milk to separate. Additionally, yogurt doesn’t like to be jostled during incubation – if it gets bumped, it will turn lumpy. Furthermore, using a culture that contains thickeners or additives can result in unusual yogurt textures. You can save your yogurt, however. Just strain away the lumps and then whisk the yogurt smooth.

My Yogurt Is Stringy. If your yogurt has a stringy or slimy texture, you can blame temperature control. Your yogurt maker might not hold a reliable temperature to make yogurt, in which case, it’s a manufacturing problem and you’ll want to reach out to customer support. Or, if your milk drops below 95 degrees when you add your culture, then bacteria that creates a slimy texture will be dominant. Also, if you used a non-dairy yogurt culture (such as soy yogurt), your texture will be different than if you had used pasteurized whole milk.

My Yogurt Is Grainy. If your yogurt has a grainy texture, rather than a smooth one, you can blame a few different things. First, a culture with additives or thickeners can result in graininess, which is why I recommend Fage as a reliable base. Second, if you heat your milk too quickly, or if you don’t mix your culture thoroughly into the milk before letting it incubate, then you may end up with a grainy yogurt.

My Yogurt Is Foamy. Yogurt should not be foamy or smell like yeast (or beer). If it does, you can bet that your batch had some cross contamination in your kitchen. Yeast from bread making or fruit fermentation (and similar recipes) can work its way into your yogurt and ruin the batch. Try to practice good kitchen hygiene and food safety and to ensure your yogurt ferments properly.

Did You Try It?

I know my process can seem a little complicated to make yogurt. If you have tips for streamlining my recipe without sacrificing consistency, please let me know in the comments below.

I also realize that yogurt can be a bit tricky to get right. If you’re troubleshooting your homemade yogurt and have a question about what went wrong, feel free to ask in the comments, too. I’m not an expert, but I may be able to help.